More Vitamin D? PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 27 January 2010 22:13
Andrew Weil, M.D., recently recommended that we raise our intake of 1,000 IU of vitamin D per day to 2,000 IU per day. Why?

According to Dr. Weil, we have known for many years that we need vitamin D - it is actually a hormone - to facilitate calcium absorption and promote bone mineralization. But newer research has shown that we also need it for protection against a number of serious diseases. In recent years, scientists have discovered that it may help to prevent cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, psoriasis and diabetes. Unfortunately, vitamin D deficiency is widespread. It is now estimated that hundreds of thousands of cancer cases worldwide might be prevented each year if we all were getting enough.

He noted that we can get vitamin D through foods such as fortified milk and cereals as well as eggs, salmon, tuna and mackerel, but the amounts are not significant. Sun exposure is the best way to get it; ultraviolet rays trigger vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Factors that decrease the body's ability to make vitamin D include dark skin, heredity, obesity and certain medications, including some anti-seizure drugs (check with your pharmacist). Most significantly, sunscreen blocks vitamin D synthesis in the skin, and in northern latitudes (above that of Atlanta, Georgia) the sun is at too low an angle for half the year to provide sufficient UV radiation. Most people need to take vitamin D, especially seniors, as the ability to synthesize vitamin D in the skin declines with age.

Don't be concerned that 2,000 IU will give you too much. With exposure to sunlight in the summer, the body can generate between 10,000 IU and 20,000 IU of vitamin D per hour with no ill effects. In addition, no adverse effects have been seen with supplemental vitamin D intakes up to 10,000 IU daily.

Dr. Weil noted that you should have take your vitamin D with a fat-containing meal to ensure absorption.

Source: Andrew Weil, M.D.
 
More articles :

» Collagen Vascular Disease

Connective tissue is a major tissue in our body and is responsible for forming the structure of the body parts. It can be considered as a tissue that forms the framework or matrix of the body. It is made up of two proteins, collagen and elastin....

» Chinese Medicine Used In The Treatment Of Scleroderma

According to many proponents of eastern medicine, Chinese medicine is a whole holistic system that can lead to a healthier, happier and more stress free way of living. It is a system that people have benefited from for over twenty-three centuries...

» Making A Connection Between Depression and Inflammation

The dramatic rise in depression diagnoses over the last two decades is a great challenge to modern medicine. I believe that part of the "depression epidemic" is false - a creation of aggressive disease-mongering by pharmaceutical companies to...

» Cancer Drug May Also Work for Scleroderma

A drug used to treat cancer may also be effective in diseases that cause scarring of the internal organs or skin, such as pulmonary fibrosis or Scleroderma.The drug, with the generic name bortezomib, stopped the production of fibrotic proteins in...

» FDA Approves New Lupus Drug

The FDA has approved (Benlysta) for reducing disease activity in (SLE), making it the first new lupus drug in more than 50 years. Belimumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting the B-lymphocyte stimulator protein, called BLyS. It was co-developed by...

» Crowdsourcing A Cure For Scleroderma

is widely known for medical innovation — from the research laboratory to the patient’s bedside — but in partnership with dedicated donors, the institution is also innovating the way it raises money to accelerate groundbreaking research.With...