Researchers Testing Intense Pulsed Light As An Alternative Treatment for Telangiectatases PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 23 December 2013 11:00
Telangiectatases are knot-like clusters of blood vessels on the skin which can occur in 30 to 50 per cent of patients with Systemic Sclerosis, also known as Scleroderma. Telangiectases tend to occur on the face, neck, and upper limbs and can cause psychological issues for patients.

Currently, doctors use laser treatment to blast the telangiectases and destroy them but this treatment can be painful at the time and result in bruising afterwards , so researchers at the Salford Royal and University of Manchester’s Institute for Inflammation and Repair have been looking for an alternative.

The researchers tested using intense pulsed light (IPL) instead of laser treatment. IPL is often used cosmetically for treating birthmarks and for hair removal. A pilot study treated 19 patients with telangiectases, using IPL on one side of the face and laser treatment on the other. They had three treatments over the course of eight weeks before the results were analysed using close-up photographs and specialist imaging.

The research showed that the effects were roughly comparable but IPL had fewer side effects.

Salford Royal Rheumatology researcher Dr Graham Dinsdale, who is also a Research Associate at the University’s Institute of Inflammation and Repair, said: “While this was only a small-scale pilot study, it does suggest the potential for an alternative, less painful, treatment for telangiectases. We will continue to do all we can to find new and better treatments for patients with Systemic Sclerosis, which is a very serious and debilitating condition.”

Source: The University of Manchester
 
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