Italians Explain Low Sex Drive In Female Scleroderma Patients PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 24 September 2013 08:26
In a world first, Italian rheumatologists have discovered why women living with Systemic Sclerosis often suffer from a low sex drive. The study of 22 women with systemic sclerosis found the disease resulted in a lack of blood flow around the clitoris compared to healthy controls.

Reduced blood flow down below was particularly evident in women with a history of digital ulcers and capillaroscopic damage, the researchers from the Sapienza University in Rome found. Like erectile dysfunction in men, the impairment of blood flow in women was most likely due to microvascular damage, the researchers said.

"Since Systemic Sclerosis produces microvascular and damage, vasoactive drugs could be used to treat genital dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis women," they wrote in an article published online in Rheumatology. But as the number of patients in the study was small it should be considered exploratory, they added.

Source: Rheumatology Update (2013)
 
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