NeoStem Awarded Grant To Develop New Treatment for Skin Wounds In Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 18 September 2013 13:40
NeoStem, as a leader in the emerging cellular therapy industry, announced that it had received an award under the Small Business Innovative Research Program of $147,765 for the “Development of Adult Pluripotent Very Small Embryonic Like (VSEL) Stem Cells to Treat Skin Wounds in Scleroderma” from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIH-NIAMS). This award will fund studies to investigate the potential of very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs™) in treating difficult to heal wounds in an animal model of Scleroderma.

VSEL™ Technology offers the potential to go beyond the paracrine effect, yielding cells that actually differentiate into the target tissue and create true cellular regeneration.

The grant will support research to be headed by Denis O. Rodgerson, Ph.D., Director of Grants and Academic Liaison of NeoStem, and Dr. Vincent Falanga, M.D., The Barbara A. Gilchrest Professor of Dermatology and Professor of Biochemistry at the Boston University School of Medicine.

The study will employ the tight skin (Tsk) mouse to test the potential wound healing capabilities of autologous VSELs™ in treating difficult to heal skin ulcers in this disease. The Tsk mouse carries a heterogeneous mutation for the fibrillin-1 gene and rapidly exhibits the characteristic tight and thickened skin phenotype of Scleroderma patients. Depending on the results of the study, the Company may quality for up to an additional $1.5 million phase 2 grant for the indication from NIH-NIAMS.

“Our collaboration with Dr. Falanga, a recognized expert in the management of chronic wounds and fibrosis, offers NeoStem a solid foundation to advance its investigation into the use of  human VSELs™ in treating skin wounds and a host of other degenerative diseases and disorders in humans, including scleroderma,” said Dr. Denis O. Rodgerson.  “This study has the potential to advance  treatments that could one day help patients suffering from this and other debilitating autoimmune diseases.”

Source: NeoStem Press Release

 
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