The Incidence Of Prostate Cancer Higher In Men With Autoimmune Diseases PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 06 May 2013 22:05
Men with autoimmune diseases have a higher incidence of prostate cancer (PCa) than those without those diseases, according to study findings presented at the American Urological Association annual meeting.

Using the National Inpatient Sample database, researchers obtained data on 189,290 men with a history of autoimmune disease—multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis, psoriasis, Sjogren's syndrome, discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA)—and a subsequent diagnosis of PCa.

The investigators, led by Zachary Klaassen, MD, a urology resident at the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, in Augusta, compared the age-specific incidence of PCa in this cohort with an external cohort of patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database (2000-2009).

Compared with the general population, the incidence of PCa was three times greater for men with MS, five times greater for men with SLE, six times greater for men with systemic sclerosis, seven times greater for men with psoriasis, nine times greater for men with Sjogren's syndrome, 10 times greater for men with DLE, and 10 times greater for men with RA, according to the researchers.
Autoimmune disease affects 3.6 million to 5.9 million men in the U.S., Dr. Klaassen and his colleagues noted.

To their knowledge, the investigators said, their study is the first to suggest an increased incidence of PCa in men with autoimmune diseases.

Dr. Klaassen cautioned that the finding of an increased incidence of PCa may be due to increased screening of patients who, because of their autoimmune disease, may receive more intensive medical follow-up.

Source: Renal & Urology News (2013), "Prostate Cancer Incidence Higher in Men with Autoimmune Disease"; original article can be viewed here.

 
More articles :

» Geneticists Hunt for Scleroderma Triggers

In all its forms, gives Dartmouth geneticist Michael Whitfield, his graduate students, and his postdoctoral researchers a sense of urgency in their search for the triggers of the chronic condition. In a study that the Journal of Investigative...

» UTHealth Scientists Closing In On Genes Tied To Scleroderma

A new study designed to test suspected links between genes and two immune disorders could open the door to better ways to diagnose and treat the conditions that affect a combined total of approximately 2.5 million people in the United States, report...

» January 26th Lunch & Learn Event on Sjogren’s Syndrome

For those of you in the state of Texas, Northwest Rheumatology, a division of Northwest Diagnostic Clinic, will host a free Lunch & Learn event on Sjogren’s Sydrome: The Forgotten Disease on Tuesday, Jan. 26, from 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the...

» Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Occurrence After Liver Transplant in Systemic Sclerosis

E. Koumakis, J. Wipff, A. Kahan, Y. AllanoreReceived on January 12, 2010; accepted in revised form on April 20, 2010.Clin Exp Rheumatol 2010: 28 (Suppl. 58): S53-S54.© Copyright CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RHEUMATOLOGY 2010.E. Koumakis, J. Wipff, A....

» Genetic Accelerator Linked To Most Severe Cases of Lupus

A "genetic accelerator" is responsible for the most severe cases of Lupus (), an autoimmune disease: the accelerator, called enhancer HS1.2, speeds up the activity of some critical genes of the immune system involved in the disease.A team of Italian...

» Researchers Revisit Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) Survival

Setting out to determine the survival of patients with (PAH), researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center and their colleagues also discovered that an equation used for more than 20 years to predict survival is outdated. Accordingly,...