Mouth Exercises For Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 07 August 2010 00:59
taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lindawild/2417728275/sizes/m/in/photostream/ via creative commons The loss of facial mobility may restrict the ability to chew foods and perform adequate moth hygiene. Below is some advice on maintaining facial mobility through exercise.

INSTRUCTIONS:
Do exercises in front of a mirror.

Massage (firm touch) the entire face using small circular motions with the finger tips, a warm facecloth or vibrator, then massage each specific area again just before exercising that part.

The number of repetitions necessary to get maximal mobility depends upon the individual. One approach is to do the exercise fast for two or three times as a warm up and then do five repetitions holding each stretch position to the count of five. Sustained stretch is more effective for increasing mobility than rapid motions.

EXERCISES:
  • Raise the eyebrows as high as possible. Return to the normal position.
  • Bring the eyebrows down and together as hard as possible as if frowning. Then raise eyebrows as high as possible.
  • Wrinkle the bridge of the nose by raising the upper lip and then frowning (as if smelling something bad).
  • Close the eyes very tight. Then release the squeeze slowly and raise the eyebrows as high as possible before opening the eyes.
  • Flare the nostrils, then narrow the nostrils down, pushing the upper lip out.
  • Make an exaggerated tight wink with each eye separately, using the cheek muscles to help close the eye.
  • Cover the teeth with the lips. Then open the mouth as wide as possible without the teeth showing. Close lips and press hard (as if blotting lipstick).
  • Open the mouth so that the lips are as wide apart as possible.
  • Open the mouth so that the teeth are as far apart as possible.
  • Push the jaw forward to create an underbite (bottom teeth in front of the upper teeth).
  • Make as wide a grin as possible without showing the teeth.
  • Keep exercising the jaw by opening and closing the mouth!

Source: HAPS (Hunter Area Pathology Service)
 
More articles :

» Systemic Sclerosis: An Update

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic disorder affecting connective tissue of skin, internal organs, and walls of blood vessels. It is characterized by alterations of the microvasculature in the form of hypoxia, digital...

» Vitamins for Scleroderma

is a class of diseases in which your skin and organs tighten and harden. This autoimmune condition occurs when your body produces an excess of , a protein that comprises your connective tissues. Scleroderma may affect the skin on your hands and...

» Coping with Autoimmune Diseases

Everybody has to cope. This was the sentiment expressed by Dr. Robert Phillips at the , when he presented on Coping with Autoimmune Diseases. As Dr. Phillips discussed, each person living and dealing with an autoimmune disease would have different...

» Increase Your Happiness Levels

Happiness is one of those concepts we all seem to love to learn more about, but we are unwilling to take any big steps to increase it in our own lives. Some experts claim happiness can be found in a particular herb or a special diet, but there's...

» Unite Against Scleroderma Event Scheduled For May 5th, 2013

is a rare, autoimmune, connective tissue disease characterized by the overproduction of collagen, which results in the thickening and hardening of the underlying connective tissues which support the skin, blood vessels, muscles, and internal organs...

» Facing Life's Challenges

At 57 years of age Anne Wersching doesn’t have a single wrinkle on her face.Sitting in her lounge room in Bayswater North, Ms Wersching looks well, save for a few red marks on her cheeks.But Ms Wersching has a little-known disease called...

Add comment

Do feel free to leave your comments, as they would add value and knowledge to the community. However, please refrain from making any disparaging, uninformed, or unrelated comments. Thanks :)

Security code
Refresh