Mouth Exercises For Scleroderma PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 07 August 2010 00:59
taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lindawild/2417728275/sizes/m/in/photostream/ via creative commons The loss of facial mobility may restrict the ability to chew foods and perform adequate moth hygiene. Below is some advice on maintaining facial mobility through exercise.

INSTRUCTIONS:
Do exercises in front of a mirror.

Massage (firm touch) the entire face using small circular motions with the finger tips, a warm facecloth or vibrator, then massage each specific area again just before exercising that part.

The number of repetitions necessary to get maximal mobility depends upon the individual. One approach is to do the exercise fast for two or three times as a warm up and then do five repetitions holding each stretch position to the count of five. Sustained stretch is more effective for increasing mobility than rapid motions.

EXERCISES:
  • Raise the eyebrows as high as possible. Return to the normal position.
  • Bring the eyebrows down and together as hard as possible as if frowning. Then raise eyebrows as high as possible.
  • Wrinkle the bridge of the nose by raising the upper lip and then frowning (as if smelling something bad).
  • Close the eyes very tight. Then release the squeeze slowly and raise the eyebrows as high as possible before opening the eyes.
  • Flare the nostrils, then narrow the nostrils down, pushing the upper lip out.
  • Make an exaggerated tight wink with each eye separately, using the cheek muscles to help close the eye.
  • Cover the teeth with the lips. Then open the mouth as wide as possible without the teeth showing. Close lips and press hard (as if blotting lipstick).
  • Open the mouth so that the lips are as wide apart as possible.
  • Open the mouth so that the teeth are as far apart as possible.
  • Push the jaw forward to create an underbite (bottom teeth in front of the upper teeth).
  • Make as wide a grin as possible without showing the teeth.
  • Keep exercising the jaw by opening and closing the mouth!

Source: HAPS (Hunter Area Pathology Service)
 
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